Date of Award

Spring 5-2-2018

Thesis Type

Open Access

Degree Name

Master in Applied Behavior Analysis and Clinical Science

Department

Health Professions

Committee Member(s)

Stephanie Kincaid

Michele Williams

Eb Blakely

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to determine if response-card technology would decrease disruptive behavior (e.g., texting, surfing the Internet, sleeping) in the college classroom. Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, a graduate classroom of 14 students from a small liberal arts college in the southeast participated. An alternating-treatments design was implemented comparing baseline (standard lecture) to Nearpod™ (an online question-feedback platform) and response cards. Results indicated neither intervention had a meaningful effect on disruptive behavior; however, the majority of students indicated a preference for Nearpod™. In Experiment 2, three participants were selected from an undergraduate class for observation. An ABA reversal design was implement with baseline and Nearpod™ conditions. Results indicated Nearpod™ did not have a significant effect on disruptive behavior; however, the majority of students indicated a preference for Nearpod™.

Rights Holder

Meera Aggarwal

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